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Metroplitan LA
1832 W. 7th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
Tel. (213) 484-0040

West LA
11540 Santa Monica Blvd.
Second Floor - Suite #203
Los Angeles, CA 90025
Tel. (310) 477-9210
 

Callus (or callosity) is an especially toughened area of skin which has become relatively thick and hard in response to repeated friction, pressure, or other irritation. Rubbing that is too frequent or forceful will cause blisters rather than allow calluses to form. Since repeated contact is required, calluses are most often found on feet because of frequent walking. Calluses are generally not harmful, but may sometimes lead to other problems, such as skin ulceration or infection.

Guitarists often develop calluses on their fingertips, due to the frequent friction on the strings. Bicycle riders can also get calluses, especially if they are not wearing gloves. While swinging on the monkey bars in a play ground, children often develop calluses just above the palms of their hands.

Although usually found on the foot (where the most pressure and friction are applied), calluses can occur anywhere on the body as a reaction to moderate, constant "grinding" pressure. It is the natural reaction of the palmar or plantar skin. Too much friction occurring too fast for the skin to develop a protective callus will cause blisters instead. Corn and Calluses are easier to prevent than to treat.

Calluses and corns may go away by themselves eventually, once the irritation is consistently avoided. They may also be pared down by another professional such as a podiatrist or a Foot Health Practitioner. Often, bleeding within a callus is an early sign of diabetes, even before elevated blood sugars may be noticed. Although the bleeding can be small, sometimes small pools of blood or hematoma are formed. The blood itself is an irritant, a foreign body within the callus that makes the area burn or itch. If the pool of blood is exposed to the outside, infection may follow. Infection may also lead to ulceration. Luckily, this process can be prevented at several places, but such infections can become life-threatening. Diabetic foot infections are the leading cause of diabetic limb amputation.